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CMJC is here to share God’s love with people who have intellectual and physical disabilities. David’s Promise, our special needs ministry, provides an inclusive atmosphere where people with and without special needs grow in faith, make friends, serve our community, and share life with one another.

 

David’s Promise is a ministry of Compassionate Ministries of Jackson County. We seek to provide an inclusive atmosphere where people with and without special needs grow in faith, make friends, serve our community and share life with one another.

Currently, David’s Promise provides a weekday ministry where people gather and create art, garden, donate time and resources to the community and more. In addition, David’s Promise provides parent support groups for families who are dealing with new diagnoses, struggling with issues surrounding the care of family members who have special needs and for people who just want to connect with others going through the same joys and struggles that they are.

So Mephibosheth ate at David’s table like one of the king’s sons.
— 2 Samuel 9:11
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Each year, CMJC hosts the dinner, graduation and prom for the graduates, students, families, and alumni of the Lyle Torrant and Kit Young Center. It is a wonderful evening that celebrates the special needs population in Jackson County!

 
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New Song Music Therapy Camp is a place where people of all ages and ability levels meet and integrate, create music, make friends, find confidence and learn new skills.

Created for individuals with special needs and their siblings, New Song provides opportunities for families to connect with one another, allows siblings of individuals with special needs the opportunity to find friends who understand their life and home experiences and brings Jackson County together to share the talents, abilities and gifts that individuals with special needs bring to our community.

In addition to serving individuals with special needs of all ages, New Song utilizes a host of volunteers and Buddy-Ups (young volunteers) who have the opportunity to learn about people who they may not always come into contact with. They gain understanding and make friendships and some young volunteer’s even end up choosing career paths in the special needs arena due to their Music Therapy Camp experiences and involvement.

 
 

Why David's Promise?

It all started when a small group of people, passionate about the future for adults with special needs, began to meet. This group consisted of parents, professionals and community members. Questions that were continually brought up by the group were:

“While school aged, these children worked so hard at building skills towards community living and employment, and then graduation arrived. What will the adult child do throughout his/her day now that they have graduated?”

“You know I really love my brother and I know my parents think that they need to be his lifelong caregiver I can see that they’re exhausted. To be really honest, I don’t want his needs to take over my life. I want him to enjoy his life but where and how?”

“Physical, Occupational, Speech and Music therapists provide services in schools, hospitals and clinics throughout childhood. As the children become adults, programs are often limited by time, money, space, transportation, age, and set curriculums. What can we do to make sure adults continue to receive the care and services they need? What if the therapy focused on how individuals fit into their community as an adult? What if the therapy occurred where they work, live and play?

“How can we help others understand that people with disabilities often want to serve in our com- munity and not just be served?”

“What can we do as a faith community to help the approximate 80% of families with a child with a developmental disability be part of a faith- based community, actively serving and enjoying community together?

“What will happenwhen the parent isno longer able tocare for their childwith special needs?” Adult children who have asibling with specialneeds communicate that their parents think that they need to be the life-long care- giver. The adult children see that their mom and dad are exhausted. These adult children love their brother or sister with special needs, but honestly, they don’t want their sibling’s needs to take over their own life. They say, “I want him to enjoy his life but where and how?